Guarding Safety

It is a small thing. 

But for me it bears the hallmarks of a promise to myself. 

That if the chainsaw needs work: a service or a sharpen, then I will put the chain guard on upside down, AND THAT I WILL NOT USE IT UNTIL THE REQUIRED WORK IS DONE. 

I guess the idea stems from spending thirty years in anaesthetic and recovery nursing, high risk endeavours that demand you develop a safe system of work both for you and your patient. 

The primary reason for a tactic that screams OCD (or as one would say, CDO.....ITS GOT TO BE ALPHABETICAL!!!!) is that if your practice is set out to be failsafe and rigidly adhered to during the caffeinated daily peak, then muscle memory will carry that action and its inherent safety system through to the dead tired hours of the night when the scientifically established parameters of fatigue,  rightly applied, mean that you MUST practice your trade despite being too fatigue intoxicated to drive home. 

Chainsaws, like anaesthesia, are inherently deadly. 

Therefore my promise to myself is that I must keep my promise to myself. 

Pete!


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