Snow to 200 Metres

And so it is that I close out my six weeks with the team at Hobart Recovery. 

.

"When you go back to the mainland, you must tell it as it is," says Nick. 

.

In other words, tell the truth. 

.

So I will. 

.

I have had the truly unique experience of being able to immerse myself in a remarkable little team of truly marvellous people who work so well together and complement each other so completely with their different skills and abilities and patient care styles. 

.

The time has just flown, faster than I could ever have expected. 

.

I guess that may have been because each day it was a joy to go to work, and because each day it was a simple thing to be proud of the team I was working with.  

.

Despite my thirty years of work and experience, I was the student. 

.

I got to learn that the most important thing of all is culture. 

.

It is not the whizz-bang equipment and the flashiness of the facility that exudes the quality of care. 

It is the way colleagues work together and respect each other and help and support and encourage each other to ply their knowledge and their craft in stormy seas and fair come what may. 

.

It is exactly this element that leads patients to comment with sincerity and gratitude on the magnificence of the care they have received. 

.

It may be the fourth day of spring on the calendar. 

.

There may be snow to 200 metres on Mount Wellington. 

.

But there will always be a warm spot in my heart for the excellent team who made me feel so welcome and so proud to be @ Hobart!

.

Pete!

.

.

.


Featured Posts
Recent Posts