Whistleblowing and Dante


Healthcare becomes an incendiary battleground every few years.

Deep-rooted problems ten years in the making become overnight sensations basted with all the human drama you could imagine.

Ironically, even if they are proved right by weight of evidence, the person who pays the highest cost is the person who advocates on behalf of all others and brings down the end-game: the 'whistleblower'.

This person has harmed the fewest in terms of deficits in behavioural or clinical competence,

and yet, they are the ones who have the nervous breakdowns, who leave their jobs, who move half a world away due to fallout from their noble actions.

With this in mind, an article in 'The Age' about the Bacchus Marsh Babies caught me by surprise:

"Regulators want more nurse and doctor whistleblowers"

http://www.theage.com.au/victoria/medical-whistleblowers-needed-to-avoid-another-bacchus-marsh-hospital-baby-death-scandal-20151020-gkea4e.html

So I got to thinking about what it means to be a whistleblower, and in due course (two days) came up with a game:

'The Seven Circles of Hell for Whistleblowers (The Game)'

Regulators want whistleblowers, but the entire healthcare spectrum must first learn to listen when good people raise red flags.

"Abandon hope, all ye who enter here" said Dante.

Was this a warning, or just good advice?

(click on the picture to go to the game)


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