Life can be Prettygreat


The 24th of September 2015 is going to be a Prettygreat day.

My nephew, Luke's new game, Land Sliders, becomes available on all good App Stores at 4 PM!

And in honour of this Prettygreat occasion, I am going to do something special.

My work on 'Shinobi' has been lying in limbo awaiting photographic disentanglement.

And RIGHT NOW, I am going to work hard on bringing it to re-release!

What is the relationship between Luke, Prettygreat, Land Sliders and Shinobi?

I used Luke's first game, Fruit Ninja (made whilst he was at Half-Brick Studios) to measure fine motor coordination, vigilance and alertness during a fatigue research project, and found a direct correlation between the taking of opportunistic micro-breaks and psychomotor performance.

That was back in 2011.

And whilst the study has been relegated to the annals of history (or is that the Sigmoid Colon of History?), the concepts embedded within the study remain as relevent today as they were back then:

Game theory of burnout

Ethics of Resource Boundary Limits

Fatigue and human performance

Duties of Organisational Care to Staff

Self-care Strategies for operating theatre nurses

The role of persisting attitudes in perpetuating negative consequences to wellbeing...

Yup, the Shinobi / Fruit Ninja scoreboard can still be found in Recovery,

Though the 'Sunshine Club' is well-hidden in shadow.

Taking a chance has landed Luke his own creative licence

through a new start-up, 'Prettygreat',

and hopefully, great authenticity and goodwill will arise from it.

Though putting everything on the line...is not for the faint-hearted.

Likewise, for us, life could be Pretty Great.

But it doesn't happen by sitting still.

As they say in the classics....

"Carpe diem!"

And thus I add via 'The Way of Pete':

"And Choken de Liven SHIT out of eet!"

I never WAS much good at Latin.

See Luke's Prettygreat website here!

Shinobi?

See Hear!!!!


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